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Do - If you go into a shop and say "do you do batteries? Do - If you drive along a motorway in the wrong lane the police will do you.

You could then tell your friends that you have been done by the police. Doddle - Something that is a doddle is a cinch, it's easy.

For example a computer program might be bespoken for a client, or you may order a bespoke holiday, where the travel agent creates an itinerary around your exact requirements. Bladdered - This rather ugly expression is another way of saying you are drunk. Blatant - We use this word a lot to mean something is really obvious. You'll hear people say "bleeding hell" or "not bleeding likely" for example. My Dad used to say "Gawd Blimey" or "Gor Blimey" or even "Cor Blimey". Blinding - If something is a blinding success - it does not mean that any eyes were poked out with sharp sticks - it means it was awesome. For example if you are telling someone how to make that fabulous banoffee pie you just served them, you would tell them to boil the condensed milk for three hours, spread it onto a basic cheesecake base, slice bananas on top, add some whipped double cream, another layer of banana and Bob's your uncle! Surprisingly it is also used in a positive manner to describe something that is the best, in which case you would describe it as being "the dog's bollocks". In the US the meaning would be almost exactly the reverse. Usually when he hit his thumb or dropped a nail or lost something. You might also bum around, if you are doing nothing in particular, just hanging out. Butchers - To have a butchers at something is to have a look.

Best of British - If someone says "The best of British to you" when you are visiting the UK, it simply means good luck. Blinkered - Someone who is blinkered is narrow minded or narrow sighted - they only see one view on a subject. Constant source of amusement to us Brits when you guys talk about blowing people off. Blunt - If a saw or a knife is not sharp we say it is blunt. Englishmen who live in America take great delight in ordering specialised registration plates for their cars using the letters B. Today we might use the sh** or the f*** words but bugger is still as common. It can also be used to tell someone to get lost (bugger off), or to admit defeat (we're buggered) or if you were tired or exhausted you would be buggered. When I won £10 on the lottery my mate called me a "lucky bugger". Finally to bum something means to scrounge it from someone. For example a street trader might bung something in for free if you pay cash right now! This is a cockney rhyming slang word that has become common.

Crap - The same word in both countries - but less rude here. For example, if we get really bad service in a restaurant (oh, you noticed!

I loved watching Brits being interviewed on US chat shows and embarrassing the interviewer when they said something was "total crap". ) then we might ask the waiter if it is a DIY restaurant - just to wind them up. You would go to a do if you were going to a party in the UK.

Sometimes we would get caught and some old bloke would come out and shout "oi clear off you lot". Cobblers - I have heard people say "what a load of cobblers" more than once. Derived from the cockney rhyming slang where Cobblers Awls = Balls! These are basically rhyming words like "butchers hook" which means "look".

If you are in London and you hear someone talk about a Septic they are probably talking about you - because it's short for "Septic tank" which equals "yank", which is our word for an American. Codswallop - Another one I heard a lot as a kid - usually when I was making up excuses for how the window got broken or why my dinner was found behind the sofa.

My licence plate on my MX5 (Miata in American) was CHEEKY, which most Texans thought was something to do with bottoms - wrong!! Cheers - This word is obviously used when drinking with friends. For example when saying goodbye you could say "cheers", or "cheers then". Americans could use it in English pubs, but should avoid the other situations as it sounds wrong with an American accent. Cheesed off - This is a polite way of saying you are pissed off with something. Chuffed - You would be chuffed to bits if you were really pleased about something. - This expression brings back memories of being a kid and stealing apples from people's gardens. It means you are talking out of your butt and has nothing to do with any kind of dessert! Cockney rhyming slang - There are lots of words that make up cockney rhyming slang.Usually happens after 11pm on a Saturday night and too many lagers! Arse over tit - Another version of arse over elbow, but a bit more graphic! I often heard people saying something like "I'll have one also". Bang - Nothing to do with your hair - this is a rather unattractive way of describing havingsex.You'd be more likely to hear someone in England ordering a pint oflager! Au fait - Another one of those French expressions that have slipped into the English language. I'd say at the end of reading all this you'd be au fait with the differences between American and English! Always gets a smile from Brits in American hair dressers when they are asked about their bangs. The normal response would be for them to say "All right"? Mostly used by blue collar workers but also common among younger people. It basically means the same asass, but is much ruder. You would say it to a complete stranger or someone you knew. Sometimes it might get expanded to "all right mate"? Arse - This is a word that doesn't seem to exist in America.

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